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THE TURQUOISE TRAIL

On June 15, 2000 the Sandia Crest Scenic Byway (NM 536) and the Turquoise Trail Scenic & Historic Byway (NM 14) were combined into a single Byway and designated the “Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway." The Trail begins above the high Chihuahuan Desert, overlooking Albuquerque and the Rio Grande Valley, surrounded by plateaus, hills and mountainous areas. Sandia Peak is the highest point at 10,600 feet above sea level. The byway begins in Tijeras, New Mexico and travels 65 miles to the outskirts of Santa Fe. This route offers numerous things to see and do depending on the amount of time you have allotted yourself to explore.

 

Tijeras is an entry point for the outdoor recreation options available in the Cibola National Forest. There is camping and an RV park in Cedar Crest, as well as a golf course just outside of Sandia Park. There is a ski resort on the way to Sandia Peak, as well as ample hiking, biking and horseback riding options. There are museums, galleries, restaurants and shops in each small town along the route. The human history along The Turquoise Trail ranges from ancient pueblo settlements to rowdy mining towns. Though there has been a growth in the amount of traffic over the last couple of decades, the Trail retains an eccentric, Old West appeal.

 

History of the Turquoise Trail

 

The Turquoise Trail is synonymous with Native American spirituality, Spanish explorers, mining towns and brave pioneers. The name is based on centuries of turquoise mining in the area. The pueblo people that settled along the Rio Grande have been extracting the greenish blue stone from the Ortiz Mountains and surrounding hills since 900 AD. The early inhabitants were agrarian; working fields in the Rio Grande valley and hunting game in the bosque near the river and on the plains east of the Sandias. They used the turquoise as a trading commodity.

 

Francisco Vazquez de Coronado was the first of many looking for treasure in this region. He had heard rumors about wealth comparable to the Aztecs. He ventured north looking for Cibola and the Seven Cities of Gold. His adventures would make for a good parable about the disasters that can ensue when you believe rumors and are driven by greed. The irony is that he set up his winter camp in Kuaua pueblo (now Bernalillo), which is about 30 miles away from Golden, New Mexico, the site of the first gold rush west of the Mississippi. He explored the Southwest from Kansas to the Grand Canyon on behalf of the Spanish crown. He never found gold.

Notes

Sporadic cell phone reception depending on carrier. Verizon tends to be better than others. May lose signal briefly en route.

 

Gas stations are available in Cedar Crest, Sandia Park and San Marcos, with nothing in between.

 

The stretch of Route 66 that runs parallel to I-25 between Tijeras and Albuquerque is equipped with rumble strips that play America the Beautiful when you go 45 mph. If you plan to drive any speed other than 45 mph, the rumble strips are incredibly annoying. Take the highway.

The highest point on this scenic byway is Sandia Crest at 10,600 feet. It is accessed via NM 536 in Sandia Park, which is also the last opportunity to get gas when heading north towards Santa Fe.

Towns on the Turquoise Trail

 

he area has a lengthy mining history involving gold, silver, copper, turquoise and coal. Whereas people often refer to Golden, Madrid and Cerrillos as ‘ghost towns,’ the current residents are very much alive and may not agree. Madrid does report a lot of ghosts seen in town, but those reporting may, or may not, have been at the Mineshaft Tavern for one too many rounds. However, there are numerous legitimate ghost towns in the area; many on inaccessible private land. Several are visible from the road, often appearing unexpectedly when taking random short cuts across the mesa.

TIJERAS

 

The Tijeras Pueblo Archaeological Site is a testament to the length of time humans have inhabited the canyons east of Albuquerque. The Tijeras Pueblo was formed about 1313 AD. It was once a thriving community with up to 400 inhabitants. . During prosperous years, it was a great location, connected to other villages through trade, with the capacity to grow corn and other crops among the pinon and juniper. Unfortunately water isn’t always abundant in this region. Drought forced relocation, with few people remaining behind. Those remaining did resurrect the pueblo briefly, though on a smaller scale, only to abandon the site completely in the early 1400s. Today the 200 room pueblo is a grass-covered mound. Archaeological exploration at the site rendered a model, but they backfilled the area to prevent vandalism and erosion.

 

Tijeras is the southern gateway to The Turquoise Trail. There is a visitor center for the Cibola National Forest providing maps and information about the area. It is a vast area. The Cibola forest encompasses almost 2 million acres across three states. There are numerous trails available for hiking, biking, horseback riding, camping, skiing and snow shoeing (when Mother Nature is feeling generous with snow). The forest is host to many Native American ceremonies, which began as early as 10,000 BC by the Clovis Paleo Indians and continues with the ceremonies of the local pueblos.
 
CEDAR CREST & SANDIA PARK

 

Cedar Crest is home to the Museum of Archaeology and Material Culture, which explores the 12,000 year story of North America’s earliest inhabitants from early migration to the Battle of Wounded Knee in 1890. There is lodging, camping and an RV Park available in Cedar Crest, with restaurants and horse rental for exploring the Cibola National Forest nearby.

 

Just up the road from Cedar Crest is Sandia Park and NM 536 through the Sandia Mountains to the Peak. The Sandia Mountains provides biking hiking, horseback riding, rock climbing, skiing and birdwatching. The highest point of the mountain is 10,678 feet. It can be accessed by taking the 13 mile drive to the top of Sandia Crest via NM 536 or by taking a 15 minute ride up the one of the world’s longest trams. The tram is 2.7 miles with an 11,000 square mile panoramic view, representing about 10% of the state of New Mexico visible from the top on a clear day.

 

Summer visitors can take a chairlift ride to the top of the mountain and bike down over 15 miles of trails. When Mother Nature is generous with snow, Albuquerque skiers can take the tram to the top and enjoy a day of skiing the quick and easy way.

 

Tinkertown Museum, which began as a hobby and passion of the late artist Ross J. Ward, is located on the Crest Road. It offers amazing animated miniature of Old West Town and circus relics, among thousands of hand-carved figures. The surrounding community hosts shops, eateries and other local services.

 

The National Parks Service designated Sandia Man Cave a National Historic Landmark in 1961 based on its significance as a paleo-american site. Located on NM 165 off of NM 536 (heading to Placitas), the site represents one of the earliest known occupations of the Americas. Excavations have generated information on three distinct prehistoric groups.

 

GOLDEN
 
One of the ironies associated with the mining history on the Turquoise Trail is that the early Spanish explorers expended an enormous amount of time and energy unsuccessfully looking for gold in these hills. It was there, but it wasn’t discovered until the early 1800s. Yet, the mining resources associated with the Ortiz Mountains attracted people long before the arrival of the Spanish or the mining boom of the 1800s. There are traces of two pueblos in the area extending back to the 1300s. They may have mined the local resources, but the mining that put Golden on the map occurred in the early 1800s.
 
Around 1825 placer gold was discovered in a stream in the Ortiz Mountains, southeast of Golden, New Mexico. News of the discovery spread, leading to the first major gold rush west of the Mississippi. This migration of prospectors preceded the California gold rush by decades. Two mining camps emerged, El Real de San Francisco and Puerto. The San Francisco de Asis church in Golden was built in 1830 to serve the miners in both camps. Mining was lucrative in the area for decades, attracting many fortune seekers to the area. The rowdy mining community that emerged was named Golden in 1879, with a post office opening the following year.
 
As the mining waned the inhabitants moved on, though ranching continued in the area. The San Francisco church is one of the most photographed buildings on the Trail. It was restored in the 1960s by historian and author Fray Angelico Chavez during his tenure as padre of the San Jose church in Cerrillos. The ruins of the town’s stone schoolhouse are on the west side of Highway 14, opposite the church.
 
MADRID

 

Located midway on the Turquoise Trail, the village of Madrid is often referred to as a ghost town, though the approximately 400 inhabitants might not agree with that categorization. From squatters to company run coal town to ghost town to arts haven, Madrid is a community that has rolled with the times and found a way to thrive. There are several galleries in town, many featuring talented local artists. There are shops, cafés, an awesome saloon, an ice cream shop and a general store. Much of Madrid's mining history has been restored or preserved, including the Miner’s Amusement Hall, the old Catholic Church, the Coal Mining Museum, most of the store fronts and many of the wooden company houses. On the outskirts of town there are still many structures in their original state, crumbling over time.

 

Madrid, and the entire surrounding area, is said to be haunted. Numerous ghost sightings have been reported in homes, in the old church, in the cemetery and in the Mine Shaft Tavern. One apparition spotted frequently is a silent cowboy. He is often seen escorting a Spanish woman dressed in her best finery down Main Street. Others have reported all types of ghostly forms in the cemetery. However, the most haunted site is the Mine Shaft Tavern, though the correlation between excessive alcohol consumption and the potential for hallucination is worth noting.

 

If ghosts exist, Madrid certainly has a history that would provide ample opportunity for more than a few to set up shop. 1,500 years ago the inhabitants from the nearby pueblos mined the turquoise and lead deposits in the Cerrillos hills. When the Spaniards arrived in 1540, they were looking for silver and gold. They weren’t that interested in turquoise. When the Spanish discovered silver and lead in the area, they returned to the area, enslaving the native population to work on their behalf. That caused conflict, erupting in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. In 1693 the Spanish returned, re-capturing the area. Though the Spaniards continued to look for gold, many began to establish farms and ranches in the area. The region remained sparsely unpopulated until the Madrid coal fields were discovered around 1835 by prospectors searching the hills around the Ortiz and San Pedro mountains for gold. After the coal reserves were discovered, the settlement that is now Madrid began to grow rapidly, with prospectors, fortune hunters and corporate interests moving in on the action.

 

The railroad’s role in western expansion and development was rapidly increasing the value of coal. Madrid, known initially as “Coal Gulch,” sits on 30 square miles of hard and soft coal. The anthracite was particularly valuable. Anthracite is a hard, compact variety of coal that has a metallic luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coal. Coal mining began around 1835. The community was established as a company town for Cerrillos Coal Company. By 1892 the yield from the narrow valley was large enough to justify the construction of a 6.5 mile standard gauge railroad spur connecting the community to the main line of the Santa Fe Railroad. By 1893 a seven story anthracite breaker was constructed and by 1899 all coal production in the region was consolidated in Madrid (aka Coal Gulch). At its peak the town produced 250,000 tons of coal a year, boasting a population larger than Albuquerque.

 

Madrid’s prominence grew in the 1920s when Oscar Huber took over the mining operations for Cerrillos Coal Company, turning Madrid into the model mining town. The company owned everything. They provided everything. They administered law and order. Wood framed cabins were dismantled in Kansas and brought to town by train to house the miners and their families. They operated the hotel, the car dealership, the stores and the tavern. They provided the schools, the hospital, the water and the power. Mr. Huber formed the Employee's Club, requiring miners to donate from .50 to $1.00 per month for community causes. Huber built the first illuminated baseball park west of the Mississippi. The lights were turned on in 1922, putting Madrid in the history books. The stadium was home to the Madrid Miners, a farm team for the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Dodgers played a game in the park to a packed house in 1934.

 

Miners were required to participate in town events, such as the Fourth of July celebration and the Christmas Light Display. By the early 1920's, Madrid was known for their annual Christmas light. Miners lit up the winter sky with 150,000 lights, powered by 500,000 kilowatt hours of electricity. It was the first electric Christmas display in New Mexico. People would come from throughout the state to see the lights of Madrid.

 

In 1947, Huber purchased the town of Madrid and the surrounding coal lands. Unfortunately, the demand for coal began to fall as natural gas became a more popular alternative for home heating. The town of Madrid collapsed with the coal market. In 1954, the Albuquerque and Cerrillos Coal Company ceased to operate and almost all of Madrid’s residents moved away. In that same year, an ad in the Wall Street Journal listed the town for sale for $250,000. There were no takers. Madrid became a ghost town for about 20 years.

 

Madrid’s revival began in the early 1970s when Joe Huber, Oscar’s son, began to rent or sell a few of the old company houses to a number artists, craftsmen, and other individuals wanting to make their homes in the mountains. Determined to breathe new life into the town, he succeeded in attracting a new population. Madrid was reborn.

 

One business managed to stay open during the lean years. The Mineshaft tavern is the oldest continually run tavern in Santa Fe County. It is also one of my favorite saloons in the state. It has a past. I would not want to send a bacterial sample from those floors to a lab.

 

The original tavern was established during Madrid’s boom, around 1895. The original structure burned down on Christmas Day in 1944, which was probably about the worst way in the world to start 1945 in a mining town. The current Mineshaft Tavern was completed in 1947. The 40 foot pine and oak bar is the “longest bar in the state.” It was designed for miners, who wanted to stand at the bar after hunching all day in the mines.

 

Much of the interior is original. Ross Ward, the artist behind Tinker Town, painted murals depicting the town’s history from mining mecca to more recent event. The murals serve as a backdrop for the state and the bar. This is a bar with enormous character, which is a kind way of saying they haven’t renovated in the last century. If the bathrooms are functional, the critical variables are covered. The tavern has been Madrid's living room for decades, more than a century if you ignore the need for a rebuild in the 40s.

 

The Mineshaft is said to be the most haunted site in Madrid. . The tavern experiences odd phenomena, like glasses falling from their shelves, mysterious sounds, furniture inexplicably relocating and orbs appearing in photos. Based on the number of sightings, it would seem that locals aren’t willing to heed last call even after death. Ghost hunting and paranormal studies have been conducted on the adjacent museum property.

The Old Coal Mine Museum is the final resting place of all manner of “stuff” from its years as a coal mining town – an eclectic and quirky mix of whatever seems to have been deemed worthy of saving when the coal mine shut down and the miners left. You’ll find everything from an old Model T to one of the earliest X-ray machines in New Mexico. The museum has numerous "ghost town buildings" that remain from the 1890's coal mining operation, including the unique "Engine House Theatre" that once house the Engine 769.
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HAWIKUH | POINT OF FIRST CONTACT

Coronado's legendary Cibola was actually the Zuni village of Hawikuh. Coronado arrived on their doorstep based on the lies of a Spanish priest, who insisted that the streets were paved with gold.

WORLD HERITAGE SITES

With three of the nation's UNESCO World Heritage sites, there is an abundance of natural and cultural heritage to explore.

JEMEZ MOUNTAINS

Explore the natural resources and history of the Jemez mountains, from the Giusewa Mission Ruins in Jemez Springs to the Valles Caldera, the third largest super volcano in the U.S.

WHITE SANDS

These beautiful, white gypsum sand dunes outside of Alamogordo are a unique testament to New Mexico's intense geological past and an ancient sea that once covered the state.

CERRILLOS
 
The community of Cerrillos exudes the rugged charm and rustic simplicity of the Old West, nestled among cottonwood trees, the streets remain mostly dirt, with adobe homes and Spanish-style courtyards. Due to the 1800s Old West vibe, the town is often used for filming movies and commercials. Many of the buildings on Main Street have tributes to the movies filmed there, with Young Guns being the most frequently cited. There is ample horse parking provided, with hitching posts still available at several of the store fronts on Main Street.
 
The Cerrillos hills are volcanic, with a distinctive cone shape, rising 1000 feet above the valley floor. The rich deposits of turquoise at twelve different sites here ultimately impacted the awareness, uses and value of the stone in the US and around the world.
 
Cerrillos, (the little hills) was known for mining long before the search for gold and silver lured the Spanish to the area. Though the start date is a matter of speculation and debate, what is known is that humans settled in this area long ago, possibly as far back as 500 AD when Basket Maker Indians were in their prime. Gold, lead and turquoise deposits drew inhabitants from the nearby pueblos. The lead ore was used to glaze and decorate traditional Rio Grande pottery. The turquoise and gold could be used to produce trading commodities. In fact, Cerrillos has the longest historically intact record of pick and shovel mining in the Southwest.
 
Turquoise has been mined in Cerrillos since at least 900 AD. The Tano Indians were the first people to establish larger settlements in the Cerrillos area. Their pueblos, large and small, were spread out randomly through the Galisteo Basin. Archaeologists believe these sites had populations of no more than a few thousand. Some of the pueblos may have been abandoned when the farm lands were depleted and inhabitants were forced to migrate. There is evidence that some of the farm land (Burnt Corn Ruin, five miles east of Cerrillos) was destroyed in battle. Tumbled stones, broken potsherds and discarded tools of rock were discovered as a testament to communities that once worked the soil and stone of these hills. Before 1300 AD members of the San Marcos Pueblo mined and controlled the turquoise deposits.
 
The Indian word “chalchihuitl,” taken from an Aztec word meaning “green,” became the name of the hill where the most substantial turquoise deposits were discovered. Mount Chalchihuitl is the site of the largest known prehistoric mining operation, and the largest single deposit of turquoise ever found, in North America. From the surface pits, short tunnels and shallow shafts, the Tanoan extracted large quantities of beautiful greenish blue turquoise. Archaeologists have discovered turquoise specimens that they believe originated from Cerrillos in cultural sites as far away as Central America, Canada and the Southeastern US. The extent of the mining is impressive because the prehistoric miners extracted enormous quantities of turquoise using rudimentary stone tools.
 
Ultimately many mineral resources were mined in Cerrillos. The Spanish explorers found gold, silver, and lead. According to local legend, Francisco Coronado, the earliest Spanish explorer seeking treasure in the region, sent specimens of Cerrillos turquoise to Spain in 1541 to be added to the crown jewel collection. Several decades after Coronado a Spanish explorer, Antonio de Espejo, wrote about the treasures being mined at a place of “little hills," giving birth to the name Cerrillos. After the Spanish discovered the wealth in the Cerrillos Hills, the Tano Indians were used as slave labor. Fifty years of conflictual, often violent, co-existence came to an end in 1680. Several cave-ins led to a strike by the Tano miners. They refused to excavate, protested mining and covered up any existence of the mines. This coincided with the Pueblo Revolt, which temporarily drove the Spanish out of the region. The mines were not rediscovered for 150 years.
 
Mining in communities nearby attracted a lot of prospectors to this area in the early 1800s. In 1879 two prospectors from Leadville, Colorado discovered one of the mines hidden by the Tano. Word of the treasures discovered spread fast and soon miners were swarming the hills.
The settlement started off as a tent city, but rapidly grew into a commercial hub for miners and ranchers. The rail road arrived in 1880, bringing many more people to the area, including some of the most notorious, like “Billy the Kid.” Tiffany & Co., as well as other New York jewelry companies, began marketing turquoise as a fashionable gem. Tiffany & Co. even acquired property at Turquoise Hill and began mining the stone for their jewelry.
 
The rapid growth of the town provided opportunity for people moving to the area. Hotels were built along with saloons, dance halls, shops and short-order houses. There were not only profits for miners but businesses that provided for them as well. One of the town’s most successful businesses was the Cerrillos Supply Company, which stocked equipment that the miners needed; e.g. shovels, picks, tools, steel and fuses. In 1899, it was reported New Mexico's production of turquoise was valued at $1,600,000, most of it coming from Cerrillos; however, by 1900 the mines began to shut down. At its peak Cerrillos was considered the capital of New Mexico; home to more than 2000 people, with 4 hotels and 21 saloons. Like all of the mining towns, the town’s fortune waned when the ore waned. People were forced to move. Today a few of the original structures remain and there is ample history in the area for those looking for it.
 
The Casa Grande Trading Post is a great stop, with deals on jewelry, turquoise from the owner’s mine, a petting zoo, scenic overlook and the Cerrillos Turquoise Mining Museum. The noteworthy tree on Main Street when approaching the church was the hanging tree, because every old west town needs a hanging tree. Saint Joseph’s church still holds mass on Sundays and provides ambiance for photo opportunists. The Cerrillos Hill State Park is just outside of town, with 1100 acres that include 5 miles of multi-use trails and an ADA trail to the village overlook. The trails are marked and tell the story of mining on The Turquoise Trail. The State Park is located a half mile north of the village on CR 59. Horses can be rented at Broken Saddle Riding Company for a true ‘western’ experience.
 
GALISTEO BASIN
 
The earliest known humans to inhabit the Galisteo Basin were Paleo Indians who arrived as early as 7500 to 6000 B.C. Around 1500 BC, people began to supplement their food supply by farming in the area. Until the 12th century, the Basin was sparsely populated, serving primarily as a trade route for turquoise, malachite, and lead mined in the Cerrillos Hills. Between 1100 and 1300 AD the southwestern United States experienced a prolonged, severe drought. The great pueblos at Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde lost population. It is believed that some of the Anasazi migrated to northern New Mexico, establishing several of the current Pueblo cultures. Other Anasazi people are presumed to have migrated to the Galisteo Basin, eventually sharing bloodlines with the Tanoan-speaking people already in residence. The newcomers planted crops and built pit houses and small, pueblo-like villages. Gradually these pueblos grew. Several large pueblos were sustained in the Galisteo Basin from the late 1200s until 1500-1600 AD. The San Cristobal Ranch, 12 miles south of the Galisteo Basin Preserve, was the setting for many of these pueblos.
 
The best known of the Basin's pueblo ruins is San Cristobal Pueblo. The San Cristobal Pueblo was constructed with 8-9 room blocks that were several stories high, organized around five ceremonial plazas. Like all pueblos, San Cristobal had a ceremonial kiva in its largest plaza. Two kivas north of Galisteo Creek may have been used by winter and summer groups. It is estimated that by 1400 A.D. the San Cristobal Pueblo was home to 500-1,000 people. Pueblo Largo, Pueblo Colorado, Pueblo Shè, and Colina Verde have also been located on the San Cristobal Ranch. These pueblos ranged in size from several-room blocks to structures with over 1,500 ground-floor rooms, kivas, shrines and/or watchtowers. Archeologists believe that the total population of these pueblos at their height was between 10,000-15,000 people. By the beginning of the Spanish Era in the 17th Century, San Cristobal was the only pueblo remaining. The other pueblos in the Galisteo Basin had been abandoned.
 
When exploring the area, a stop in Galisteo is worthwhile.

Camping

Madrid Lodging

Cedar Crest Lodging

Visitor Info

Turquoise Trail Campground: RV sites, tent sites and cabins. The RV sites include full hookups in grassy areas with picnic tables. RV sites with just water and electric connections are available. A dump station is available for those who stay on sites without sewer hookups. The tent sites are in a separate area with  picnic tables, charcoal grills, restrooms, showers and a dish-washing station.

Hidden Valley RV Park: 104 camping sites, including 85 full hookups. Recreational facilities include hot tub, heated swimming pool, a community building, picnic areas and hiking trails. Molly's Bar, which is located on the old Route 66 and features live musical entertainment, is a few minutes to the southwest of the resort.

Java Junction B & B

2855 NM-14, Madrid, NM 87010

(505) 438-2772

 

Ghost Town Trading Post Casitas

2864 NM-14, Madrid, NM 87010

(505) 471-7605

 

High Feather Ranch B & B.

29 High Feather Ranch Rd

Los Cerrillos, NM 87010

(505) 424-1333

 

Hacienda Dona Andrea

78 Vista Del Oro

Los Cerrillos, NM 87010

(505) 424-8995

Elaine's Bed & Breakfast Comfort and hospitality in a three story log home. (505) 281-2467 or (800) 821-3092

 

Cedar Crest Inn & Hostel Large hacienda with passive solar features. Dormitory and private rooms available. (505) 281-4117

 

Cedar Crest Country Cottage Guest ranch and vacation rental with beautiful views of the Sandia's sloping east side. (505) 281-5197

 

Turquoise Trail RV Park: Recreational facilities include hot tub, heated swimming pool, a community building, picnic areas and hiking trails. (505) 281-2005

turquoisetrailrv@gmail.com

Sandia Ranger Station provides a welcome center with maps, area information, restrooms, travel/road conditions, and tips regarding trails and sites to see in the area. They are located in Sandia Park (see map). (505) 281-3304

 

New Mexico Public Lands Information Center provides excellent resources for outdoor recreation on state or federal land. Maps, guide books, permits and LOTS of free information. This location is at the Santa Fe end of highway 14 (see map). Look for the dinosaurs...local peculiarity and a great photo opportunity. 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico, (877) 276-9404

 

Tales and Trails Tours offers half and full day tours of the Turquoise Trail. Custom tours available. (505) 466-4706 lauriefrantz@gmail.com

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THE TURQUOISE TRAIL

Camping

Madrid

Cedar Crest

Info

Turquoise Trail Campground: RV sites, tent sites and cabins. The RV sites include full hookups in grassy areas with picnic tables. RV sites with just water and electric connections are available. A dump station is available for those who stay on sites without sewer hookups. The tent sites are in a separate area with  picnic tables, charcoal grills, restrooms, showers and a dish-washing station.

Hidden Valley RV Park: 104 camping sites, including 85 full hookups. Recreational facilities include hot tub, heated swimming pool, a community building, picnic areas and hiking trails. Molly's Bar, which is located on the old Route 66 and features live musical entertainment, is a few minutes to the southwest of the resort.

Java Junction B & B

2855 NM-14, Madrid, NM 87010

(505) 438-2772

 

Ghost Town Trading Post Casitas

2864 NM-14, Madrid, NM 87010

(505) 471-7605

 

High Feather Ranch B & B.

29 High Feather Ranch Rd

Los Cerrillos, NM 87010

(505) 424-1333

 

Hacienda Dona Andrea

78 Vista Del Oro

Los Cerrillos, NM 87010

(505) 424-8995

Elaine's Bed & Breakfast Comfort and hospitality in a three story log home. (505) 281-2467 or (800) 821-3092

 

Cedar Crest Inn & Hostel Large hacienda with passive solar features. Dormitory and private rooms available. (505) 281-4117

 

Cedar Crest Country Cottage Guest ranch and vacation rental with beautiful views of the Sandia's sloping east side. (505) 281-5197

 

Turquoise Trail RV Park: Recreational facilities include hot tub, heated swimming pool, a community building, picnic areas and hiking trails. (505) 281-2005

turquoisetrailrv@gmail.com

Sandia Ranger Station provides a welcome center with maps, area information, restrooms, travel/road conditions, and tips regarding trails and sites to see in the area. They are located in Sandia Park (see map). (505) 281-3304

 

New Mexico Public Lands Information Center provides excellent resources for outdoor recreation on state or federal land. Maps, guide books, permits and LOTS of free information. This location is at the Santa Fe end of highway 14 (see map). Look for the dinosaurs...local peculiarity and a great photo opportunity. 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico, (877) 276-9404

 

Tales and Trails Tours offers half and full day tours of the Turquoise Trail. Custom tours available. (505) 466-4706 lauriefrantz@gmail.com